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Removing Candle Wax from Carpet

wax in carpet

 

 

 

 

 

 

Removing candle wax from carpet can be tricky, but not impossible. You should only attempt to remove wax from synthetic carpet, never from upholstery or any type of natural fibers such as cotton, wool, or silk (contact a professional carpet and upholstery cleaner for these types of fabric).

You will need water, an iron, and thick white cotton towel.

  1. Dampen the towel until it is almost soaking wet.
  2. Place the towel on the wax.
  3. Plug in the iron and adjust the temperature to the LOWEST setting.
  4. Place the iron on top of the wet towel on the carpet.
  5. After 10 seconds remove the towel and iron, and check to see if the wax has melted.
  6. If the wax has not melted, raise the temperature of the iron a VERY small amount and repeat steps 4. and 5.
  7. Repeat steps 5. and 6. until the temperature of the iron reaches the melting point of the wax.
  8. Once the wax melts, it should easily transfer onto the wet towel that has been placed on top of it.

Keep in mind that dye from candle wax may never come out completely, but at least you will have removed the actual wax embedded in the carpet.

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How to Remove Paint from Carpet

paint on carpetFor paint spills, as with all liquid spills, ACT FAST. Once the pain dries, it will usually stain the carpet permanently.

First, contain the wet paint and absorb with paper towels or napkin or rags that you don’t mind throwing out. Before you apply any chemicals or solvents, test them in an inconspicuous area of the carpet to make sure it won’t damage the carpet.

For Acrylic Paint
Apply glycerin to the stain and blot it up. Then remove the residue with rubbing alcohol and go over the remaining stain with a mild detergent and water using a sponge or rag.

For Oil Based Paint
Oil based paint will definitely damage the carpet if it sits for too long. Use turpentine or mineral spirits to remove the paint, then blot with rubbing alcohol and finally use a mild detergent and water with a sponge or rag.

For Latex Paint
Blot up as much as possible, then apply a mixture of 1 tablespoon of mild detergent with 1 cup of warm water. Repeat as necessary.

For Water Based Paint
Blot up as much as possible, then continue to blot with vinegar, and finally blot with a mild detergent and water and a sponge.

Dry Paint
Scrape away as much paint as you can, then apply WD-40. Let it sit for 20 minutes, then blot the area clean using a mild detergent and water. Repeat as necessary.

The Benefits of Scotchgarding (Fabric Protecting)

Scotchgarded

Scotchgarding is a process that is used on fabric, carpets, and upholstered furniture to protect it from staining. It also helps keep grime and dirt from attaching to the fibers by acting like a protective seal, and is often used after furniture or carpet cleaning to prolong the benefits of these services. Fabric has tiny “dye sites” that hold the coloring of the fabric, and the Scotchgard or Teflon protectant fill those open dye sites and put a small microscopic protective seal on the top of fabric.

Scotchgarding is very beneficial for several reasons:

  • It protects the carpet and furniture.
  • It protects the life of your carpet and furniture.
  • It saves you money (you need to have the fabric cleaned less frequency as compared to fabric that is not protected).
  • It makes your job easier when you are spot cleaning the fabric.
  • It prolongs the “freshly cleaned” look after carpet and upholstery cleaning.

Scotchgard was discovered by accident by a lab technician who was working on a project and spilled a drop of Scotchgard on her tennis sneakers. After some time she noticed a clean spot on her now dirty shoes, thus the invention of Scotchgard.

Although most companies don’t use actual Scotchgard and Teflon protectants, they are considered generic terms like “Kleenex” or “Coke”. Many protectants are safer and greener than the original kind developed in the 1950’s. There are solvent based and water based protectants. The solvent based ones are a type of “fluorochemical polymers” and the water based ones are just water based protectants. There are benefits and drawbacks to both kinds.

Come back next week to read our blog about the History of Scotchgard.

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